Types, Causes, Signs, And Symptoms Of Chronic Mouth Ulcers


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Mouth ulcers, also known as canker sores, are small lesions that form on the inside of your mouth. They’re often painful and can make it difficult to eat or speak. While most mouth ulcers are a minor annoyance, some can be a sign of a more serious condition.

If you have mouth ulcers that don’t go away after a few weeks, or if they recur frequently, it’s important to see your doctor. There are many potential causes of chronic mouth ulcers, and the right treatment depends on the underlying cause.

What are mouth ulcers and what are the symptoms

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Mouth ulcers, also known as canker sores, are small lesions that form on the inside of your mouth. They’re often painful and can make it difficult to eat or speak. Symptoms of mouth ulcers include:

-Sores that are red, white, or yellow

-Sores that are round or oval

-Sores that have a defined border

-Sores that are located on the inside of your cheeks, lips, gums, or tongue

-Sores that are painful to the touch

-Sores that make it difficult to eat or drink

What are the causes of chronic mouth ulcers?

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There are many potential causes of chronic mouth ulcers, including:

-Infections: Mouth ulcers can be caused by infections, such as viral infections, bacterial infections, or fungal infections.

-Allergies: Allergic reactions can sometimes cause mouth ulcers.

-Autoimmune disorders: Autoimmune disorders, such as Crohn’s disease or celiac disease, can sometimes cause mouth ulcers.

-Medications: Mouth ulcers can be a side effect of some medications, such as NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), beta-blockers, and chemotherapy drugs.

-Nutritional deficiencies: Mouth ulcers can sometimes be a sign of a nutritional deficiency, such as iron deficiency or vitamin B12 deficiency.

-Stress: Stress can sometimes trigger the development of mouth ulcers.

What are the treatment options for chronic mouth ulcers?

The best way to treat chronic mouth ulcers depends on the underlying cause. Treatment options include:

-Antibiotics: If your mouth ulcers are caused by an infection, you may need to take antibiotics.

-Corticosteroids: Corticosteroids can help reduce inflammation and pain. They’re available in topical forms (gels or creams that you apply to the affected area) or systemic forms (pills that you take by mouth).

-Antihistamines: If your mouth ulcers are caused by an allergy, you may need to take antihistamines.

-Immunosuppressants: If your mouth ulcers are caused by an autoimmune disorder, you may need to take immunosuppressants.

-Acid-blocking medications: If your mouth ulcers are caused by acid reflux, you may need to take acid-blocking medications.

-Pain relievers: Over-the-counter pain relievers, such as ibuprofen (Advil) or acetaminophen (Tylenol), can help relieve the pain of mouth ulcers.

When to see a doctor

If you have mouth ulcers that don’t go away after a few weeks, or if they recur frequently, it’s important to see your doctor. Your doctor can determine the underlying cause of your mouth ulcers and recommend the best treatment options.

What are the complications of chronic mouth ulcers?

Chronic mouth ulcers can sometimes lead to complications, such as:

-Infections: If mouth ulcers are left untreated, they can sometimes become infected.

-Scarring: Mouth ulcers can sometimes leave scars.

-Difficulty eating: Mouth ulcers can make it difficult to eat or drink, which can lead to weight loss.

-Difficulty speaking: Mouth ulcers can sometimes make it difficult to speak.

-Anemia: People with chronic mouth ulcers are at risk of developing anemia. Anemia is a condition in which there’s a decrease in the number of red blood cells. Red blood cells carry oxygen to the body’s tissues.

-Oral cancer: People with chronic mouth ulcers are at an increased risk of developing oral cancer. Oral cancer is a type of cancer that forms in the tissues of the mouth or throat.

If you have chronic mouth ulcers, it’s important to see your doctor so that any underlying causes can be treated and complications can be prevented.

Conclusion

Mouth ulcers, also known as canker sores, are a common problem that can affect people of all ages. While the cause of mouth ulcers is often unknown, there are several factors that can increase your risk of developing them. Symptoms of mouth ulcers include a burning or tingling sensation in the mouth, pain when eating or drinking, and a sore or red lesion on the inside of the cheek or lip. If you experience any of these symptoms, it’s important to see your dentist so they can diagnose and treat the condition. Left untreated, chronic mouth ulcers can lead to further oral health problems.

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